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Webkit Bug: Hover and Sibling Selector

Not only Internet Explorer has it flaws when it comes to parsing/using the CSS file. Even though the Webkit engine is the best CSS engine out there (at the moment), I was still able to find a little bug while searching for a solution to a problem last week.

Although the bug is really small and you'll probably never need to use it in real life, I did want to give it a little attention (just in case you do want to solve this problem). I found this one since I wanted to create another Proof of Concept for an article here. Of course, I hope this problem could be solved in the next release of the engine.

Webkit Bug

In simple words, this bug occurs when combining the generic sibling selector (in CSS: ~) in combination with the hover event (in CSS: :hover). Dive into the example/source code to see how it looks like, and think about the effect you think it would produce.

Demo Webkit Bug   Download Webkit Bug

Take note this is a webkit bug only: The example works just fine in Firefox, Opera (and yes - even in Internet Explorer!). It doesn't work in those browsers using webkit: Safari and Chrome. Now let's dive into the problem, and look at possible solutions for this bug.


Tags:  webkit bug hover sibling selector css
 
jPong - 3d pong created with jQuery

It's pretty amazing at how fast people can learn certain technologies. A couple of months ago, I learned my friend and ex-classmate Sidney te Grotenhuis some (basic) jQuery. Last week, he contacted me to show off his latest creation: jPong. I was blown away.

By combining jQuery with a collision detection plugin, a line drawing plugin and some own scripting, he was able to create this game. Feel free to dig in the source code (comments were added) to see how it works. But for now, simply start the game and play.

jPong - 3d pong created with jQuery

As you might already see, this game is based on the popular Flash version called Curveball.

Play jPong   Download jPong

I want to thank Sidney a lot for sharing this great example with us. Take note this is just a simple proof of concept and not fully tested in any way. Now let's see if you can beat your browser at this neat little jQuery game! What highscore can you get?


Tags:  jpong 3d jquery game javascript
 
Display social icons in a beautiful way using CSS3

Although I didn't like CSS animations at first, the more I work with it, the more I do like the way it's implemented. A couple of days ago, I visited a website called Pubwich. The overall design of the website looks pretty good, but the part with the social media buttons attracted me even more. When you hover a icon, a small tooltip is displayed with the name of the social media. All other icons have a low opacity.

I wanted to take this concept and bring it to the next level using CSS3 transitions. The goal was to slowly fade-in and fade-out the opacity changing, and animate the position of the tooltip a little bit. With that in mind, I was able to create a beautiful social media icons display using CSS3.

Display social icons in a beautiful way using CSS3

The example works with all -webkit based browsers (Safari and Chrome), but also in Firefox 4. I've included a jQuery version as well, to be used as a form of "backward compatibility". You can also see how the same effect can be achieved using CSS and jQuery.

Demo Social icons CSS3 animations   Download Social icons CSS3 animations

Although the code and effect is very minimal, it'll give your website a very professional look. Let's dive into the code to see how you can implement something like this on your own website. Take not this effect can be applied to more buttons as well, not only social media icons.


Tags:  css3 animation jquery social icons tutorial
 
HTML5 data-* attributes are great and you know it

Like I said in my previous article, all information about HTML5 is way too big to put into one blog article. We first looked at what HTML5 microdata can do for us, and today we'll dive into another feature W3C added to their HTML specification. It's called custom data attributes (by developers mostly referenced as data-* attributes), and I'll explain what it is and what problems it fixes for us.

HTML5 data-* attributes

The data-* attributes are extremely useful, especially for JavaScript developers. W3C describes the use of these kind of attributes as: Embedding custom non visible data to your HTML. But why would you need it? Let's take a dive into this new HTML specification. Although this article has a strong focus on jQuery, I assume you understand it counts for any other library and (of course) JavaScript itself.


Tags:  html5 data custom attribute tutorial
 
HTML5 Microdata: What is it, and why should you care?

HTML5 is booming. One of the main reasons more and more articles about this subject are popping up on the web, is because more and more webbrowsers are supporting it. Even the most feared browser by webdevelopers "Internet Explorer" is making huge progress to make IE9 HTML5 ready. The demo's Microsoft created tell us enough already.

But what exactly is HTML5? This subject is way too big to place into one blog article, but I'm trying to handle several aspects of the subject in several posts. For today, we'll take a look at one of the new features of HTML5 called microdata. I'll explain what it is, and why you should start using it.

HTML5 Microdata

I assume you don't want to read any further, if you can't start using this HTML5 microdata right now. Lucky for you, microdata is one of the features that you can start using today already! Browsers that don't (fully) support HTML5 will completely ignore the microdata. For those who completely love SEO: Search engines will absolutely love microdata.


Tags:  html5 microdata microformat tutorial vocabulary
 
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